Desmond Tutu

Church reform
In 2002, Tutu called for a reform of the Anglican Communion in regard to how its leader, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is chosen. The ultimate appointment is made by the British Prime Minister and thus Tutu said that the selection process will be properly democratic and representative only when the link between church and state is broken. In February 2006 Tutu took part in the 9th Assembly of the World Council of Churches, held in Porto Alegre, Brazil. There he manifested his commitment to ecumenism and praised the efforts of Christian churches to promote dialogue to diminish their differences. For Tutu, "a united church is no optional extra."

 

Bible
Tutu says he reads the Bible every day and recommends that people read it as a collection of books, not a single constitutional document: "You have to understand is that the Bible is really a library of books and it has different categories of material," he said. "There are certain parts which you have to say no to. The Bible accepted slavery. St Paul said women should not speak in church at all and there are people who have used that to say women should not be ordained. There are many things that you shouldn't accept."[98]

Gay rights
In the debate about Anglican views of homosexuality, he has opposed Christian discrimination against homosexuals while suggesting homosexual church leaders should currently remain celibate. Commenting days after 5 August 2003 election of Gene Robinson, an openly gay man, to be a bishop in the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Tutu said, "In our Church here in South Africa, that doesn't make a difference. We just say that at the moment, we believe that they should remain celibate and we don't see what the fuss is about."[99] Tutu has remarked that it is sad the Church is spending time disagreeing on sexual orientation "when we face so many devastating problems – poverty, HIV/AIDS, war and conflict".[100]
Tutu has increased his criticism of conservative attitudes to homosexuality within his own church, equating homophobia with racism. Stating at a conference in Nairobi that he is "deeply disturbed that in the face of some of the most horrendous problems facing Africa, we concentrate on 'what do I do in bed with whom'".[101]In an interview with BBC Radio 4 on 18 November 2007, Tutu accused the church of being obsessed with homosexuality and declared: "If God, as they say, is homophobic, I wouldn't worship that God."[102] Tutu has said that in future anti-gay laws would be regarded as just as wrong as apartheid laws.[103]
Tutu has lent his name to the fight against homophobia in Africa and around the world. He stated at the launching of the book 'Sex, Love and Homophobia' that homophobia is a 'crime against humanity' and 'every bit as unjust' as apartheid. He added that "we struggled against apartheid in South Africa, supported by people the world over, because black people were being blamed and made to suffer for something we could do nothing about; our very skins...It is the same with sexual orientation. It is a given."[104]
He supported the creation of the Harvey Milk Foundation after being a co-recipient of 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom with Harvey Milk and meeting Milk's nephew, Stuart, who accepted the Medal on behalf of his uncle. Tutu remains involved as a founding member of the Foundation's Advisory Board.[105]

Women's rights
On 8 March 2009, Desmond Tutu joined the campaign "Africa for women's rights" launched by The International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), The African Centre for Democracy and Human Rights Studies (ACDHRS), Femmes Africa Solidarité (FAS), Women's Aid Collective (WACOL), Women in Law and Development in Africa (WILDAF), Women and Law in South Africa (WLSA) and a hundred other African human rights and women's rights organisations. This campaign for the fulfilment of women's human rights, and the end of violence and discrimination against women, aims to generate mass mobilisation and draw maximum attention, in order to increase pressure on African States to ratify the international and regional women's human rights protection instruments, without reservation, and to respect them, in domestic laws and in practice.

Family planning
In 1994, Tutu said that he approved of artificial contraception and that abortion was acceptable in a number of situations, such as incest and rape. He specifically welcomed the aims of the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo.[106] He accepted the full legalization of abortion in South Africa, in 1996, despite some personal reservations[107]

Climate change
Tutu was at the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. He made a speech in front of many at the event. Tutu is also a "Climate Ally" in the "tcktcktck Time for Climate Justice" campaign of the Global Humanitarian Forum and a 350.org messenger.[108]

US immigration laws
On 28 April 2011, Tutu published a strongly worded article about Arizona Senate Bill 1070, which criminalises illegal immigration in the US State of Arizona, and requires Arizona police to request immigration documentation of any person suspected of committing a crime, a clause which would require immigrants to carry documentation on their person at all times. He stated that he was "saddened today at the prospect of a young Hispanic immigrant in Arizona going to the grocery store and forgetting to bring her passport and immigration documents with her. I cannot be dispassionate about the fact that the very act of her being in the grocery store will soon be a crime in the state she lives in. Or that should a policeman hear her accent and form a “reasonable suspicion” that she is an illegal immigrant, she can – and will – be taken into custody until someone sorts it out, while her children are at home waiting for their dinner." He urged the State of Arizona to create a new model to deal with the pitfalls of illegal immigration, one that "is based on a deep respect for the essential human rights Americans themselves have grown up enjoying."[109]

[edit] Other humanitarian initiatives
In 2009 Tutu joined the project "Soldiers of Peace", a movie against all wars and for a global peace.[110][111]
Also in 2009, along with prominent chefs and celebrities like Daniel Boulud and Jean Rochefort, Desmond Tutu endorsed Action Against Hunger's No Hunger Campaign calling on the former Vice-President Al Gore to make a documentary film about world hunger.[112]
[edit] Academic role
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Tutu delivering the keynote address at the University of the Western Cape's New Member Recognition Event, 2009
In 1998, he was appointed as the Robert R Woodruff Visiting Professor at Emory University, Atlanta. He returned to Emory University the following year as the William R Cannon Visiting Distinguished Professor. In 2000, he founded the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation to raise funds for the Desmond Tutu Peace Centre in Cape Town. The following year he launched the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation USA, which is designed to work with universities nationwide to create leadership academies emphasising peace, social justice and reconciliation.
In 2001, the Desmond Tutu Educational Trust, with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, launched the Desmond Tutu Footprints of the Legends Awards to recognise leadership in combating prejudice, human rights, research and poverty eradication. Since 2004, he has been a Visiting Professor at King's College London. In 2007 and in 2010, he joined 600 college students and sailed around the world with the Semester at Seaprogramme.[113]
Archbishop Desmond Tutu co-chairs 1GOAL Education for Allcampaign which was launched by Queen Rania of Jordan in August 2009 which aims to secure schooling for some 72 million children world-wide who cannot afford it, in accordance with the Millennium Goal Promise of education for all by 2015 giving them an opportunity to get education through the FIFA 1Goal campaign.[114][115]

Genome
In the ongoing effort to research the diversity of the human genome, Archbishop Tutu donated some of his own cells to the project. They were sequenced as an example for a Bantu individual representing Sotho-Tswana and Nguni speakers (publication: February 2010).[116]

One Young World
Desmond Tutu has signed up to be one of the Counsellors at One Young World – a non-profit organisation which hopes to bring together 1500 young global leaders of tomorrow from every country in the world.

AWEPA
Desmond Tutu currently serves as the honorary chair of the Association of European Parliamentarians with Africa's (AWEPA) Eminent Advisory Board.[117]

Honours
See also: List of honours for Desmond Tutu
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Tutu at the University of Pennsylvania
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Dr. Desmond Tutu at The Faculty of Protestant Theology in Vienna
On 16 October 1984, the then Bishop Tutu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel Committee cited his "role as a unifying leader figure in the campaign to resolve the problem of apartheid in South Africa".[118]This was seen as a gesture of support for him and The South African Council of Churches which he led at that time. In 1987 Tutu was awarded the Pacem in Terris Award.[119] It was named after a 1963 encyclical letter by Pope John XXIII that calls upon all people of good will to secure peace among all nations.[120]In 1992, he was awarded the Bishop John T. Walker Distinguished Humanitarian Service Award.
In June 1999, Tutu was invited to give the annual Wilberforce Lecture in Kingston upon Hull, commemorating the life and achievements of the anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce. Tutu used the occasion to praise the people of the city for their traditional support of freedom and for standing with the people of South Africa in their fight against apartheid. He was also presented with the freedom of the city.[121]
In 1978 Tutu was awarded a fellowship of King's College London, of which he is an alumnus. He returned to King's in 2004 as Visiting Professor in Post-Conflict Studies. The Students' Union nightclub, Tutu's, is named in his honour.[122]
In 1996 Tutu was the first recipient of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Award for Outstanding Service to the Anglican Communion, a new award created specially for him, and designated the highest possible award within the Anglican Communion, standing in precedence ahead of the previous highest award, the Cross of St Augustine, gold division.
In November 1999 Tutu was awarded an honorary doctor by the University of Fribourg
In June 1999 Tutu was elected an Honorary Fellow of Sidney Sussex College in the University of Cambridge, from which he has been awarded the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Divinity.
In 2006 Tutu was named an honorary patron of the University Philosophical Society, Trinity College, Dublin, for his tremendous contributions to peace and discourse.
Freedom of the city awards have been conferred on Tutu in cities in Italy, Wales, England and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He has received numerous doctorates and fellowships at distinguished universities. He has been named a Grand Officer of the Légiond'honneur by France; Germany has awarded him the Order of Merit Grand Cross, and he received the Sydney Peace Prize in 1999. He is also the recipient of the Gandhi Peace Prize, the King Hussein Prize and the Marion Doenhoff Prize for International Reconciliation and Understanding. In 2008, Governor Rod Blagojevich of Illinois proclaimed 13 May 'Desmond Tutu Day'. On his visit to Illinois, Tutu was awarded the Lincoln Leadership Prize and unveiled his portrait which will be displayed at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield.[123]
In October 2008, Tutu received the Wallenberg Medal from the University of Michigan in recognition of his lifelong work in defence of human rights and dignity.
In November 2008, Tutu was awarded the J. William Fulbright Prize for International Understanding.
On 8 May 2009, Tutu was the featured speaker during Michigan State University's spring undergraduate convocation. During the commencement, an honorary doctor of humane letters degree was bestowed on Tutu. Two days later, he received an honorary doctor of divinity degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[124]The two schools had coincidentally met in the previous month's NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship, a detail not missed by Tutu.[125]
In May 2009 Tutu was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the University of Edinburgh.[126]In commemoration of this event the University established the Desmond Tutu Masters' Scholarship for students from Africa to do postgraduate Master's study within the School of Divinity.[127]
Tutu was awarded an honorary degree from Bangor University, Bangor, Wales, on 10 June 2009. During the ceremony, Tutu thanked the people of Wales for their role in helping end apartheid.
On 12 June 2009 the University of Vienna conferred the degree "Doctor Theologiaehonoriscausa" on Desmond Tutu. The Faculty of Protestant Theology and Senate based the decision on Tutu's outstanding achievement in developing and establishing what can be called "ubuntu-theology", his manifestation of what became known as "public theology". By integrating the principles of the South African ubuntu philosophy with his theological thinking, he made a major contribution beyond classical Liberation Theology.
Southwark Cathedral named two new varieties of rose in honour of Desmond and Leah Tutu at the 2009 RHS Flower Show at Hampton Court Palace. To celebrate the event, the Southwark Cathedral Merbecke Choir gave a concert in the presence of Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu and his wife Leah at Southwark Cathedral on 11 July 2009.[128][129] The Archbishop joined the choir on stage for its encore – an arrangement of George Gershwin's 'Summertime'.
In 2009 he also received the Spiritual Leadership Award from the international Humanity's Team movement[130][131] and the Presidential Medal of Freedom from U.S. President Barack Obama.[132]
Tutu was inducted into the Golden Key International Honour Society as an Honorary Member in 2001, by the University of Stellenbosch.[133]
The Archbishop was named an Honorary Chairman of Building Tomorrow's Board of Directors. Building Tomorrow engages young people in their mission to build schools for underserved children and communities in Uganda. Tutu has said, "I believe that education is the key to unlocking the door that will eradicate poverty and that young people have the power to make it happen."

World Justice Project
Desmond Tutu serves as an Honorary Co-Chair for the World Justice Project which works to lead a global, multidisciplinary effort to strengthen the Rule of Law for the development of communities of opportunity and equity.

Media/film appearances
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Tutu at the "DeutscherEvangelischerKirchentag" 2007
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Tutu at the World Economic Forum 2009

  • I Am documentary by Tom Shadyac (2010)
  • The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (for which Ferguson won a Peabody Award) (2009)
  • Fierce Light documentary by Velcrow Ripper (2008)
  • Iconoclasts Desmond Tutu and Richard Branson (2008)
  • I Am Because We Are (2008)
  • For the Bible Tells Me So (2007)
  • Virgin Radio (2007) – Tutu contacted Virgin Radio on 15 October 2007 in the "Who's Calling Christian" phone in where famous people ring in to raise a substantial amount of money for charity.
  • The Foolishness of God: Desmond Tutu and Forgiveness (2007) (post-production)
  • Our Story Our Voice (2007) (completed)
  • 2006 Trumpet Awards (2006) (TV)
  • Nobelity DVD (2006)
  • De skrevhistorie (1 episode, 2005)
  • The Shot That Shook the World (2005) (TV)
  • The Peace! DVD (2005) (V)
  • The Charlie Rose Show (1 episode, 2005)
  • Out of Africa: Heroes and Icons (2005) (TV)
  • Big Ideas That Changed the World (2005) (mini) TV Series
  • Breakfast with Frost (3 episodes, 2004–2005)
  • Tavis Smiley (1 episode, 2005)
  • The South Bank Show (1 episode, 2005)
  • Wall Street: A Wondering Trip (2004) (TV)
  • The Daily Show (1 episode, 2004)
  • Bonhoeffer (2003)
  • Long Night's Journey Into Day (2000)
  • Epidemic Africa (1999)
  • Cape Divided (1999)
  • A Force More Powerful (1999)
  • Gimme Hope Jo'anna the 1988 hit single by Eddy Grant, which was banned by the South African Government, mentions Tutu as "The Archbishop who's a peaceful man."
  • Tutu the 1986 album by Miles Davis is dedicated to Tutu. The title track, written by Marcus Miller, has become a jazz fusion standard.

Writings
Tutu is the author of seven collections of sermons and other writings:

Tutu has also co-authored or made other contributions to numerous books:

  • Bounty in Bondage: Anglican Church in Southern Africa – Essays in Honour of Edward King, Dean of Cape Town, with Frank England, Torguil Paterson, and Torquil Paterson (1989)
  • Resistance Art in South Africa, with Sue Williamson (1990)
  • The Rainbow People of God, with John Allen (1994)
  • Freedom from Fear: And Other Writings, with Václav Havel and Aung San SuuKyi (1995)
  • Reconciliation: The Ubuntu Theology of Desmond Tutu, with Michael J. Battle (1997)
  • Exploring Forgiveness, with Robert D. Enright and Joanna North (1998)
  • Love in Chaos: Spiritual Growth and the Search for Peace in Northern Ireland, with Mary McAleese (1999)
  • Race and Reconciliation in South Africa (Global Encounters: Studies in Comparative Political Theory), with William Vugt and G. DaanCloete (2000)
  • South Africa: A Modern History, with T.R.H. Davenport and Christopher Saunders (2000)
  • At the Side of Torture Survivors: Treating a Terrible Assault on Human Dignity, with BahmanNirumand, SeppGraessner and Norbert Gurris (2001)
  • Place of Compassion, with Kenneth E. Luckman (2001)
  • Passion for Peace: Exercising Power Creatively, with Stuart Rees (2002)
  • Out of Bounds (New Windmills), with Beverley Naidoo (2003)
  • Fly, Eagle, Fly! with Christopher Gregorowski and Niki Daly (2003)
  • Sex, Love and Homophobia: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Lives, with Amnesty International, Vanessa Baird and Grayson Perry (2004)
  • Toward a Jewish Theology of Liberation, with Gustavo Gutierrez and Marc H. Ellis (2004)
  • Radical Compassion: The Life and Times of Archbishop Ted Scott, with Hugh McCullum (2004)
  • Third World Health: Hostage to First World Wealth, with Theodore MacDonald (2005)
  • Where God Happens: Discovering Christ in One Another and Other Lessons from the Desert Fathers, with Rowan Williams (2005)
  • Health, Trade and Human Rights, with Mogobe Ramose and Theodore H. MacDonald (2006)
  • The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa, with Marcus Samuelsson, Heidi Sacko Walters and GediyonKifle (2006)
  • The Gospel According to Judas by Benjamin Iscariot, by Jeffrey Archer and Frank Moloney (2007) - Tutu narrates the audiobook version
  • Made for Goodness: And Why This Makes All The Difference, with Mpho Tutu (2010)
  • God Is Not A Christian: And Other Provocations, with John Allen (2011)

Tutu has also written articles for Greater Good, a magazine published by the Greater Good Science Center of the University of California, Berkeley. His contributions include the interpretation of scientific research into the roots of compassion, altruism, and peaceful human relationships.